Tag Archives: fast-paced

Student Review: White Fang, by Jack London (review by Cam Y.)

White FangWhite Fang by Jack London

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

White Fang is not a book about love and happiness. Many scenes in the book are very descriptive and show the terror that White Fang instills into other animals. This book is about morality, redemption, and brutality. When White Fang kills something the author describes it really well by telling what White Fang did and how he killed it. It then describes the dead animal and the blood. White Fang is half wolf half dog born in the wild of the Yukon. He later on gets caught by natives and is held in captivity by them. They take him in as their pet and all of the other dogs don’t get along with him because he is a wolf and the feud the two animals have. White Fang starts getting used to it but a couple months later he was sold away for alcohol by the chief of the natives. After that White Fang becomes a fighting dog trained to kill other dogs. He was treated badly and was not cared for by anybody making him hate. He later on fights a pitbull and wins but is badly hurt. After that he is taken by a loving family who cares for him. They want to change him into a good animal and not dangerous. This book tells the reader what things can happen and how attitudes change if in the right or wrong environment.–Student:  Cam Y.

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Filed under *Student Review, Classic, Fiction

Angel Burn, by L. A. Weatherly

Angel BurnAngel Burn by L.A. Weatherly

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I will never view the angels in the same (heavenly) light again. In Angel Burn , by L. A. Weatherly, angels have been slowly invading Earth, revealing themselves to humans with what feels like divine benevolence. Instead, however, the angels malevolently sap the humans of their energy and ultimately their health, while simultaneously anesthetizing them with feelings of great joy and gratitude. The angels’ scheme seems destined to yield world dominance, if it weren’t for interference from the story’s two main characters. Willow is a not so typical high school student who feels more comfortable with her head under the hood of a car than a hair dryer. She has a gift for clairvoyance and first learns of the angels when conducting a psychic reading for a high school acquaintance who is desperate for Willow’s help. Alex, a handsome, home-schooled Angel Killer with AK tattooed on his well-defined bicep, is dispatched by the CIA to assassinate Willow, but why? Alex trails Willow to the local Church of Angels to learn more about his unlikely target, and when the angels turn violently on Willow, the pair are thrust into the road trip of their lives. The story is fast-paced, the characters are well developed and likeable, and the premise of evil angels is provocative. The inevitable romance that develops is tender, sweet and believable. I recommend this to those who enjoy paranormal romance and adventure.

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The Ask and the Answer, by Patrick Ness

The Ask and the Answer (Chaos Walking, #2)The Ask and the Answer by Patrick Ness
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

This book lives up to the expectations set by its predecessor, but as the second book in the Chaos Walking series I am loath to describe it in fear of spoiling the first. Suffice it to say, if you’ve read The Knife of Never Letting Go, you know now that you MUST read this. Don’t worry, it won’t take you long at all! Make sure you’ve got the third book, Monsters of Men, ready and waiting!

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The Knife of Never Letting Go, by Patrick Ness

The Knife of Never Letting Go (Chaos Walking, #1)The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Welcome to Prentisstown, a village on a far off planet settled by those fleeing from a scarred Earth in search of a simpler life. The Mayor preaches fire and brimstone from the pulpit, there are no children under the age of 13 in the village, and there are no women. Oh, and it’s loud. So loud that the village’s youngest member, Todd, seeks refuge in the swamp with his annoyingly loyal dog Manchee. But even Manchee is noisy, his thoughts, like those of all of the men of the village, are broadcast to the world nonstop. Manchee’s thoughts are exactly what you would imagine if a dog could talk (“Todd, hungry?”), and are endearing. The thoughts of the other men of the village, however, are disturbing and relentlessly unfiltered. This is what happened when they landed on the planet: men’s thoughts were laid bare, and the women all died. It’s no wonder Todd needs a respite. The silence of the swamp is enticing, but what Todd finds there rocks his world and causes him to question everything he has ever been told about his past. It also causes him to flee, with the Mayor and his posse in hot pursuit, hoping to overtake Todd before he reaches his thirteenth birthday and becomes a man. Let the trilogy begin!

If you loved The Hunger Games, and hunger for more fast-paced, disturbing, dystopic story telling, then this is the next trilogy for you. Be forewarned, however, you have to read all three books in the Chaos Walking trilogy to find out what happens to Todd and Manchee…and Violet.

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