Tag Archives: loyalty

Student Review: Game of Thrones, by George R. R. Martin (reviewed by Joshua L.)

A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1)A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

For term 2 (and more), I have started reading George R.R. Martin’s Game of Thrones. It is about various characters in the fictional fantasy world of Westeros and their families’ power struggle for the Iron Throne. Whoever holds the Iron Throne controls all of Westeros. At first, the characters are separated doing their own thing. However, a series of events and dilemmas unite them. I find this interesting when it happens because many of them have different cultures which sometimes causes conflicts to arise because of the different interpretations/opinions of one another’s ways. There is no main character in Game of Thrones as Martin focuses on numerous characters. If there was a character that the book focuses on the most, I would say that this character is Daenerys Targaryen. She is involved in many of the conflicts between the various characters and holds a considerable amount of sway as she is the only remaining child of the predecessor of the Iron Throne. This book covers the topic of power and deceit which play an important role in many of the events that occur. Others should read this book because it compares itself to our world and helps the reader understand what conflict is and how it affects us. It is well-written and I would definitely recommend it to anyone who is into the fantasy genre. A reader that dislikes a book that has an abundance of lengthy and/or sexual content should avoid this book.
~ Student: Joshua L.

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Student Review: A Game of Thrones, by George R.R. Martin (reviewed by Alex D.)

A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1)A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

In a world of clashing swords, betrayal, and amazing, stunning turn arounds that will make your mouth drop to the floor, I present you the first book of the series of A Song of Ice and Fire written by George R. R. Martin, A Game of Thrones. The book opens with many mysterious signs that “Winter is coming” with the discovery of the ancient White Walkers and Direwolves. These signs spark worry and curiosity among the people of the North, the Starks of Winterfell. This book is complex and filled with very different and distinctive characters, with very different settings. In addition to the Stark family, the other important families in the book are the Lanasters, the Baratheons and the Targaryens. All of these families want power, represented by the throne. It’s the most important place for a man. Who wouldn’t want to be King? Like I did, you will also fall in love with the characters of this book and have a favorite that you will connect with. In the setting where power, money, and the quest for survival, is what matters in a very unstable world where people do what they can to be on top and survive the brutal reality of the realm. It was the most enjoyable, however long hours of reading I have ever done. If you would like to discover all of the amazing adventures and mysteries of books and their characters, I highly recommend this book to you because of what Ned Stark, Lord of Winterfell, says “Winter Is Coming” (19). ~ Student: Alex D.

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Student Review: The Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien (review by Jay N.)

The Lord of the RingsThe Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien

My rating: 2 of 5 stars

The story of The Lord of the Rings is a journey of freedom fighters which illustrates how much our duty calls us at anytime and how important friendship is. I was intrigued when I saw what an amazing movie franchise it was. After a lot of encouragement, I finally decided to read this trilogy starting with the first book. Now I don’t see this book as good as others describe it. First, the beginning was confusing. Even more, as I progressed, it became more and more difficult to comprehend the story, with all its twists and turns. This book is full of not just humans, but also creatures I never heard of like the Hobbits. The way Tolkien described them, Hobbits are young even at an age that’s chronologically old for humans as stated, “At ninety he was much the same as at fifty.” The setting Middle Earth may have a geography similar to our world like fields and volcanoes, but some places are magical or cursed in its land like the dark kingdom of Mordor. In the story, the Hobbit Frodo Baggins and his friends are on a mission to destroy the One Ring in order to save all of Middle Earth from the dark lord Sauron. This book is a lot like the Eragon series, but the last dragons in this book died out many years ago. When I was trying to get all I have read in my head, I understood that there is a lot to learn for a person to understand this story.–Student:  Jay N.

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Student Review: Seventeenth Summer, by Maureen Daly (review by Fay H.)

Seventeenth SummerSeventeenth Summer by Maureen Daly

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Do you remember the way you felt before your first date? How it was the most terrifying experience of your life? Seventeenth Summer tells the story of a girl struggling with her first relationship, the complications that went with it, as well as getting ready to go off to college. A quote I believe shows this is, “You see, it was different! It wasn’t because it was with Jack either, it was something much more then that. It wasn’t written as it’s written in magazine stories or as in morning serials where the boy’s family teases him about liking a girl and gets embarrassed and shutters.” This portrays an important piece of this book because Angie, the main character, tells just how she feels towards Jack, her first relationship. Also, Angie Morrow had to break away from her parents a bit in order for all this to happen. This book was extremely detailed in the sense that you could really picture the characters and how they looked and acted. Also, I really enjoyed the author’s writing style of this book, as well as the subtle way that Maureen Daly put the story in 1950’s era. With that said, at times I thought the story was a bit too detailed and bored me at times. For example, I would be reading and I would start to drift off because I would be waiting for something exciting to happen, and it just would be too detailed and I would lose interest and start doing something else. Plus, when I would read, it seemed as though it was detailed and I wouldn’t really get much information, just the details of a situation or issue. Don’t get me wrong, I did enjoy Seventeenth Summer, mainly because I could relate to it in many ways. I also love romance, so it was a good for or me, as well as anyone who enjoys romance. More teenagers would like this book, and I do recommend this book. I personally would have chosen a book maybe a little less detailed, because I feel that’s what really lost some of my interest.–Student: Fay H.

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Student Review: Sleeping Freshmen Never Lie, by David Lubar (review by Roee G.)

Sleeping Freshmen Never LieSleeping Freshmen Never Lie by David Lubar
My rating: 1 of 5 stars

When I saw the cover and title, the only thing I wanted to do was to read the book. Now the only thing I want to do is warn other people not to read the book. David Lubar’s Sleeping Freshmen Never Lie successfully bored me to death with its magnificently dull plot. Firstly, the author’s style is horrendous. The main character, Scott Hudson, is an average kid with nothing special about him. Dedicated solely to depict Scott’s journey throughout freshmen year, this book is terrible. I personally despised how the book consisted of multiple diary entries, all of which are addressed to Scott’s unborn sibling. The author tried too hard to recreate a teenager and ended up creating a mess. Secondly, Scott writes his diary entries with an unbelievable and unmatchable level of immaturity. Scott consistently greets his sibling with stupid names and references like when Scott says, “Hey, toe sucker” (199). It is even more humiliating when Scott says, “Hey, you fluid-dwelling piece of protoplasm” (55). This book is supposed to be humorous but instead it’s one of the worst reads I’ve ever had. Referring to his unborn sibling as a “fluid-dwelling piece of protoplasm” (55), Scott merely embarrasses himself over and over. Is that supposed to be funny? Grow up, Scott! Why did he refer to his sibling as a “toe sucker”? It was phrases like these that made me lose respect for Scott and this book. At home, my eyes closed as I write this review, I realized that the bottom line is that it is better to get hit by a truck than to read this book.–Student: Roee G.

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