Tag Archives: Magic

Student Review: The Fires of Merlin, by T.A. Barron (reviewed by Andrew K.)

The Fires of Merlin (The Lost Years of Merlin, #3)The Fires of Merlin by T.A. Barron

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Even the great wizard Merlin had a childhood. Merlin begins his journey to discover who he really is and where he came from when in a fit of rage he accidentally set a fire using magic, and while trying to save someone from the fire he lost his eyesight. The book that I am reviewing is Merlin the Raging Fires by T.A. Barron. In this book Merlin must fight a dragon that threatens the magical island of Fincayra, but the dragon isn’t the only thing that wants him dead. This book and the rest of the series are about the childhood of the wizard Merlin. The writing is very descriptive and the fact that the author imagined all of it and made good books out of it is amazing. The books could be a little more specific about some things but besides that they are pretty good. This book is the third in the series so if you decide to read it read the first two before you do. I recommend this book to anyone who likes fantasy or is interested in the original legend of Merlin. These books are a believable interpretation of the background of the wizard Merlin and I Highly recommend reading them. ~ Student: Andrew K.

View all my reviews

Leave a comment

Filed under *Student Review, Fantasy

Student Review: A Game of Thrones, by George R. R. Martin (reviewed by Lior E.)

A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1)A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

In the past, have you ever enjoy The Lord of the Rings? Well, a new J.R.R Tolkien has emerged from the literary world of fantasy and adventure, George R.R Martin, the author of Game of Thrones. This book is enthralling, addictive, and overall an amazing book to read.

In this book, Martin uses different points of view for different characters, which causes quite a lot of foreshadowing throughout the series. As you read the point of view of an innocent person, Martin can switch the POV to one of a malicious person wanting to do the innocent person harm. Because of this, you will become enthralled with the backstabbing and alliances found in this novel. The only problem with this book I find is that there are a lot of sexual occurrences, too many most people would say, so it feels like a Lord of the Rings mixed with 50 Shades of Grey.

Although extremely sexual, the plot can be quite addictive. Much like The Lord of the Rings, this novel sets in a fantasy world, although it is not too different than Europe would be during the medieval ages, except it has dragons and all kinds of mythical creatures. In this novel, several noble families fight amongst each other for power, while a woman who can give birth to DRAGONS seeks to reclaim the kingdom the nobles fight over. While this is all happening, dangerous creatures come from the cold North of this kingdom. All these events create a fictional world which entices readers everywhere.

I recommend this book to people of mature ages, because of the graphic and sexual content found in this novel. However, past the grand amount of sexual things in this novel, it is an amazing book. ~ Student: Lior E.

View all my reviews

Leave a comment

Filed under *Student Review, Fantasy

Name of the Wind, by Patrick Rothfuss

The Name of the Wind (The Kingkiller Chronicle, #1)The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

I really didn’t want to read this. I resisted as long as I possibly could. I’m not a big fantasy fan, and who has time to read 800pp fantasy tomes? Seriously, do you know how many regular novels I could read in the time it takes me to get through a fantasy tome? But in the face of extreme pressure from my son (age 17), and then my husband (older), resistance proved futile and I succumbed. I’m so glad I did. This is high quality, genuinely literary, epic fantasy. It’s also not hard core. It’s subtle, sneaking the magic and creatures in so artfully, so convincingly, so humanly, and so realistically that even the most skeptical reader (i.e., me), has no difficulty suspending disbelief. In fact, there are times when it feels more like historical fiction than fantasy. In the same way that Harry Potter appealed to a much wider audience than the fantasy core, this book has something to offer all readers, even those committed to contemporary realistic fiction. Because this is an epic story with one sequel out and the third in the trilogy on the way, I am not even going to try to synopsize the plot in this review. Suffice it to say that the story centers on Kvothe (pronounced Quothe), a hero we witness develop from his childhood as a savante traveling with his family in an itinerant entertainment troupe, through tragic loss, brutal survival on the city streets, and ultimate university training in “sympathy,” a sophisticated, intellectual form of magic that takes much more than a wand to conjure. This is also a story within a story, as a mature Kote (Kvothe’s pseudonym in exile) recounts the tale of his youth to a traveling Chronicler who arrives in his wayside inn seeking a story. Oh what a story he receives. Go on, try it, you’ll like it! ~Ms Dimmick

View all my reviews

Leave a comment

Filed under Fantasy

The Wise Man’s Fear, by Patrick Rothfuss

The Wise Man's Fear (The Kingkiller Chronicle, #2)The Wise Man’s Fear by Patrick Rothfuss

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

I can’t believe I read the whole thing! Not because it was bad, but because it was soooo long, and it’s the second in an eventual trilogy of epic fantasies. Reading this thereby committed me to yet another 1000+ pages at some point in the future, something I am loathe to do. The unexpected glory of The Name of the Wind is what ultimately caused me to save The Wise Man’s Fear for a summer indulgence. When else can a teacher read 1,000 pages and not lose track of the plot? It was a good, but not great, summer read. I was thrilled to spend time with Kvothe again, and to witness his continued struggles and conquests at the University and beyond. This classic hero did not disappoint, endearing himself to me with his boyish charm and sensitivity while simultaneously wowing me with the intellect, talent and skill (at just about everything) that he brought to bear on a series of epic adventures “abroad.” What more would one want from a hero? The reason I capped this review at three stars has to do with the amount of fluff and filler that Patrick Rothfuss infused into an otherwise entertaining story. The fact that a lot of that filler came in the form of 50+pages of this 16 year-old’s first sexual encounter, and that this was with a fairy (sorry, member of the fae) might also have something to do with it. I’m sure this would appeal to some, but I found it tedious. Nevertheless, I expect I’ll be reading the final installment of The Kingkiller Chronicle when it finally comes out (projected for 2014), because I really, really need to know how Kvothe lost his mojo. I’ll stop here, before I give away too much. If you loved The Name of the Wind, it’s worth carrying on with this second installment. If you didn’t, save yourself the excessive reading time. ~ Ms Dimmick

View all my reviews

Leave a comment

Filed under Fantasy

Daughter of Smoke and Bone, by Laini Taylor

Daughter of Smoke and Bone (Daughter of Smoke and Bone, #1)Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Karou is a talented art student in Prague with blue hair, tattoos, a best friend named Zuzana and an annoyingly attractive ex-boyfriend. The story starts out normal enough set against the backdrop of an elegantly described city of mystery and romance. Slowly some magic begins to slip in, but so stealthily that you don’t recognize it as fantasy. Small wishes granted through the beads of a necklace, hair that grows blue from the roots. Easing deeper into the fantasy genre, the reader is introduced to Karou’s family through the sketches in her book: fantastical creatures, the chimea, adorned with horns and crocodile smiles, raising Karou as their own behind unmarked doors to another world entirely. Karou runs errands for them now, collecting teeth for Brimstone, her adoptive father, in Marrakesh and Paris, returning to school in Prague to face a befuddled but forgiving Zuzana. Karou seems resigned to this double life, but yearns to understand her past, her adoptive family and the parallel world they inhabit. Things become even more complicated when she meets Akiva, an angel of unimaginable beauty to whom she is magnetically drawn despite the threat he presents to her beloved chimea. They become star-crossed lovers edging closer and closer to the cliff that concludes this first dramatic first book in the series. Beautifully written and richly imagined, this book is ideal for fantasy lovers seeking mystery, romance, and a sequel. ~Ms. Dimmick

View all my reviews

Leave a comment

Filed under Fantasy