Tag Archives: relationships

The Sun Is Also a Star, by Nicola Yoon

The Sun Is Also a StarThe Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

I loved this book. Natasha and Daniel meet in New York City on what might just be the most important day of each of their lives. Natasha, an undocumented immigrant from Jamaica, is on her way to a meeting that might just be able to avert the deportation of her family that night. Daniel, the son of Korean immigrants, is on the way to his interview for Yale, what his parent’s call the second best university (Daniel’s older brother goes to #1 university – Harvard). The book chronicles the day they spend together as Daniel tries to use a scientific method published in The New York Times to get Natasha to fall in love with him. Since I listened to this in audio via the Axis 360 app, it almost felt like Natasha and Daniel’s twelve hours together were unfurling in real time. ~ Ms. Steiger

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Student Review: All I Know Now, by Carrie Hope Fletcher (reviewed by Tess G.)

All I Know Now: Wonderings and Reflections on Growing Up GracefullyAll I Know Now: Wonderings and Reflections on Growing Up Gracefully by Carrie Hope Fletcher

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The self-help book, All I Know Now; Wonderings and Advise on Making Friends, Making Mistakes, Falling in (and Out of) Love, and Other Adventures in Growing Up Hopefully by Carrie Hope Fletcher is like a mug of hot chocolate after coming in from the snow. It’s like an all-knowing older sister who doesn’t judge you. Carrie talks about her experiences with bullying as a child (I know, sounds boring- she tells it really well), how to get over the terrible Teen Age, her social media conflicts, how to live with yourself, how to and how not to get over relationships, and really, how to become your own best friend. I definitely think most people should read this book! It has some really great advice- it puts a lot of your problems in perspective. It truly feels like an older sister and best friend in a book. If you’ve never read a self-help book before (this is my first one, actually) and you’re looking for one, this is definitely the one. Especially if you’re in high school. I don’t think anyone should avoid this book, as it can be useful to a wide range of people- although, it is targeted to young girls. If you need help, if you don’t need help, if you like books that make you feel warm and content inside- go for it.
~ Student: Tess G.

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Student Review: The Answer to the Riddle Is Me: A Memoir of Amnesia by David Stuart MacLean (Reviewed by Max G.)

The Answer to the Riddle Is Me: A Memoir of AmnesiaThe Answer to the Riddle Is Me: A Memoir of Amnesia by David Stuart MacLean

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to wake up in the middle of nowhere and have no idea why you are there or who you are? Well then, welcome to “The Answer to the Riddle Is Me,” by David Stuart MacLean, a fascinating recollection through memoir of how its author became an amnesiac. The book’s main draw comes from the fact that it is a true story; it makes it extremely interesting to read about what it is actually like to lose your memory. The format of the book reflects that too, being broken into short, fragmented sets of pages, each representing an individual memory of the author.

David wakes up in a train station in India when he realizes he has no idea who he is, and from there he is rescued by a police captain, housed by an sonless elderly mother, captured and taken by government officials to an insanity ward, and then everything else is an upward spiral to his recovery. Pictures and documents from when the events actually happened are scattered throughout as well, really placing the reader in the moment.

My only complaint is that as the book goes on, events become less exciting, and sometimes it becomes a bit of a chore to read. Regardless, the majority of “The Answer to the Riddle Is Me” is hooking, and I would definitely recommend it to anyone in need of a new nonfiction book.~Student: Max G.

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Student Review: A Game of Thrones, by George R. R. Martin (reviewed by Lior E.)

A Game of Thrones (A Song of Ice and Fire, #1)A Game of Thrones by George R.R. Martin

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

In the past, have you ever enjoy The Lord of the Rings? Well, a new J.R.R Tolkien has emerged from the literary world of fantasy and adventure, George R.R Martin, the author of Game of Thrones. This book is enthralling, addictive, and overall an amazing book to read.

In this book, Martin uses different points of view for different characters, which causes quite a lot of foreshadowing throughout the series. As you read the point of view of an innocent person, Martin can switch the POV to one of a malicious person wanting to do the innocent person harm. Because of this, you will become enthralled with the backstabbing and alliances found in this novel. The only problem with this book I find is that there are a lot of sexual occurrences, too many most people would say, so it feels like a Lord of the Rings mixed with 50 Shades of Grey.

Although extremely sexual, the plot can be quite addictive. Much like The Lord of the Rings, this novel sets in a fantasy world, although it is not too different than Europe would be during the medieval ages, except it has dragons and all kinds of mythical creatures. In this novel, several noble families fight amongst each other for power, while a woman who can give birth to DRAGONS seeks to reclaim the kingdom the nobles fight over. While this is all happening, dangerous creatures come from the cold North of this kingdom. All these events create a fictional world which entices readers everywhere.

I recommend this book to people of mature ages, because of the graphic and sexual content found in this novel. However, past the grand amount of sexual things in this novel, it is an amazing book. ~ Student: Lior E.

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Student Review: The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky (review by Lily O.)

The Perks of Being a WallflowerThe Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Judging a book by its cover is a sin that we all at one point partake in. There’s no denying it. I generally like to pride myself in having a good sense of judgment in these sorts of things and in the case of The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky, I must say, I was right. I was drawn to the creative way the cover artist had put together the front, a shocking relationship of bright lime green and a muddy brown that drew an unexpected quirkiness to the cover, doing justice to the material inside. Quirkiness is a trait which weaves in and out of the story subconsciously and with the pairing of the word curious, these two words give a very good summary of the book. The Perks of Being a Wallflower is a book in which the reader is, I believe, always curious. Charlie in himself is very curious, writing, “I don’t understand the significance of this, but i find it very interesting” p(50). Though a small quote it portrays a lot about the book and Charlie’s character. A lot of the time Charlie just talks about what he finds fascinating, interesting, funny, scary, and in many ways they are a reflection of his thoughts, therefore his curiosity offers insight into who he is as a person. When Charlie first begins writing his letters, there is never any mention of whom he is writing to, a very good strategy, because it leaves the reader constantly guessing as to who the “friend” is. Charlie begins his letters when he begins high school. A very emotional boy of 15, he soon finds himself drawn to two older step-siblings, Samantha (or Sam) and Patrick. While Charlie is just beginning his high school life, they are just ending theirs. Soon enough they are best friends and Charlie is included in all of their outings with the rest of their little group. But Charlie faces an emotional dilemma: he finds himself to be madly in love with Sam, while Sam has made it clear that she doesn’t want him to have feelings for her. While Charlie continues his burning passion for Sam (though slightly more discreet), he is introduced to the world of drugs, sex, alcohol and lots and lots of cigarettes. His family is also changing: as the year goes on, his brother is off to college, his sister faces relationship problems, and a drama, and Charlie still always thinks about his aunt Helen who died, a subject that nobody really wants to go into. The Perks of Being A Wallflower is a book that I would most definitely recommend. A book with unexpected dramas, memories, and twists around every corner, it never bores. A powerful novel that leaves you haunted, a book that will surely not be forgotten.–Student: Lily O.

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Filed under *Student Review, Contemporary Realistic Fiction